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Words L.Cloudsdale Images D.Watson

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Words L.Cloudsdale Images D.Watson

At some point over the past few years, most of us will have witnessed swathes of shoppers camping out on city centre streets in the hope of securing a Black Friday bargain. It’s a sight that makes us feel that the universal weakness for gratuitous consumerism appears to have engulfed humanity – but at what cost? Should we really be elbowing strangers out of the way for the sake of grabbing a cut-price TV?

Discount culture is conditioning consumers by forcing them to doubt the intrinsic value of a product. In the fashion industry especially, there’s widespread cynicism about the true price of the garments on sale. If brands are able to offer 50% (or more) off, what does it tell us about their original ticket price? If shops are in sale more than not, what does it say about the supply? If businesses are artificially inflating prices at the beginning of each season with a view to slashing them again, how can they expect customer loyalty? We understand how consumers are tantalised by the prospect of saving a few quid, but at Private White, we charge a fair price all year round that accurately reflects the quality and craftsmanship of everything we do. So, for us, there will be no Black Friday sale. Ever.

Sales used to be about clearing the shop floor twice a year to make way for the new seasons stock. Walk down any high street (or log-on to any online store) these days, and it’s a sea of year-round ‘sale’ signs – we’re all beginning to wonder if shops ever sell anything at full-price anymore. Black Friday epitomises this markdown madness, and at Private White, we feel like the time is right to open up a conversation with other British brands to ask whether events like this are putting businesses like ours in jeopardy.

Over the next few weeks we’ll be opening up the debate, in a bid to find out why consumers are being duped by a system of false pricing that, if we’re not careful, could crush companies like ours, who refuse to be a slave to the sale trade.

At some point over the past few years, most of us will have witnessed swathes of shoppers camping out on city centre streets in the hope of securing a Black Friday bargain. It’s a sight that makes us feel that the universal weakness for gratuitous consumerism appears to have engulfed humanity – but at what cost? Should we really be elbowing strangers out of the way for the sake of grabbing a cut-price TV?

Discount culture is conditioning consumers by forcing them to doubt the intrinsic value of a product. In the fashion industry especially, there’s widespread cynicism about the true price of the garments on sale. If brands are able to offer 50% (or more) off, what does it tell us about their original ticket price? If shops are in sale more than not, what does it say about the supply? If businesses are artificially inflating prices at the beginning of each season with a view to slashing them again, how can they expect customer loyalty? We understand how consumers are tantalised by the prospect of saving a few quid, but at Private White, we charge a fair price all year round that accurately reflects the quality and craftsmanship of everything we do. So, for us, there will be no Black Friday sale. Ever.

Sales used to be about clearing the shop floor twice a year to make way for the new seasons stock. Walk down any high street (or log-on to any online store) these days, and it’s a sea of year-round ‘sale’ signs – we’re all beginning to wonder if shops ever sell anything at full-price anymore. Black Friday epitomises this markdown madness, and at Private White, we feel like the time is right to open up a conversation with other British brands to ask whether events like this are putting businesses like ours in jeopardy.

Over the next few weeks we’ll be opening up the debate, in a bid to find out why consumers are being duped by a system of false pricing that, if we’re not careful, could crush companies like ours, who refuse to be a slave to the sale trade.